Commentaries

Get Lost in The Maze Runner

Get Lost in The Maze Runner

The Maze Runner: Director Wes Ball

Review by Casey Cook

SPOILER ALERT!!!

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The Maze Runner movie skyrocketed to first in the weekend box office profits for the YA science fiction thriller section making $32.5 million. That means the movie was a huge hit and that we’ll all get to see our beloved characters again in The Scorch Trials. But how well did the movie do in comparison to the book? Did it live up to the standards millions of readers had after reading the books?

I think yes.

Although, the movie did leave out some of my favorite parts/aspects of the book. Let’s dive in with the biggest change Director Wes Ball made.

The biggest change was the maze. I loved the amazing CGI effects of the maze in the movie which made it way more exciting than in the book, but the exit was different. For starters there was no Cliff. In the book, the maze came to an end, a bottomless pit the boys called the Cliff. The Cliff was very important since it doubled as both the way out of the maze and how Thomas outsmarted three Grievers on his first night out in the maze by sending them over.

Since there was no Cliff they changed the way out of the maze making it a pathway to a big mechanical door that needed a key. I feel this change made it too clichéd. At least in the book, the Cliff was interesting and intriguing.

Then there’s the change with Gally. Not his character per say, but his past. In both the book and movie Gally hates Thomas, but for different reasons which I find fairly important to discovering Thomas’s background.Maze-RunnerGally

The movie: Gally hates Thomas because everything started changing when Thomas arrived. Gally is portrayed as the mean, ruthless boy who is all about following the rules.

The book: Gally hates Thomas because Gally went through the Changing and saw Thomas was involved in making the maze, just like Ben and Alby saw. This character quality is to give Thomas (and the audience) hints as to who Thomas really is. The movie did this, but made it into a series of flashbacks when Thomas slept (again clichéd and not all that interesting. If Thomas was having visions and flashbacks within a week of being in the Glade, why didn’t any of the 50 other boys have similar visions? They all went through the exact same thing).

This is where it gets even more confusing with the movie (at least to those who’ve read the book) pertaining to the Grievers and the Changing.

First off let me explain a few things: A) a Griever sting causes you to have visions and remember a little bit about WCKD (WICKED in the book). B) the process explained in A) is called the Changing. C) (in both book and movie) at night the walls leading out to the maze close and no Glader has ever survived a night in the maze.

Now let’s continue on.

In the book majority of the Grievers come out at night, but there are a few that come out during the day (and some of the boys had been stung by going in the maze during the day, thus the Gladers learned about the Changing). In the movie none come out during the day until Thomas shows up. Keep in mind that no one has ever lived through a night in the maze so technically in the movie no one has ever seen a Griever much less been stung by one. So how is that when Ben and Alby get stung, the Gladers all of a sudden know all about the Changing? Supposedly, in the movie, this has never been done before. Where’s the logic in that?

Now there were several other chamazerrun2nges from book to movie, but those were all acceptable changes that weren’t all that important (i.e. Thomas and Teresa’s telepathy in the book). Some changes were made to move the movie along (i.e. the Griever attack where the Grievers attacked all Gladers until daybreak instead of just taking one each night like in the book).

In making a movie from a book, screen writers and directors must make hard decisions to cut and add certain aspects of the storyline presented in the book. This is only because books can be hours long if every movie was made to match the book perfectly. So I believe The Maze Runner deserves its 7.6/10 rating on IMBD and is a must see movie for both super fans and new audiences alike.

Was there a change in the movie that irritated you? Or something that worked well in the movie? Let us know in the comments below!

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